How a Real Estate Closing Works

How a Real Estate Closing Works

You’ve showed your client the property and he seems very interested in it, then he decides he’s going to buy it. Now you have reached closing, which is the final step in executing a real estate transaction. But you’ll have to go through a few processes before the transaction is actually over.

Several things happen during closing: the buyer and the lender deliver a check for the balance owed on the purchase price. Then the seller signs the deed over and gives it to the buyer. A recorder’s office, which will record the deed, will require the seller’s signature to be notarized. Commonly, the seller delivers possession to the buyer by giving them the keys to the property. Unless otherwise specified in the real estate contract, delivery of possession should be on the closing date, which is usually several weeks after the offer is formally accepted.

A title company, lawyer, notary, or the buyer will register the new deed with the local land registry office or recorder’s office. A declaration or statement by the buyer or seller regarding the purchase price may have to be filed with the government. Conveyancing taxes and recorder’s fees will typically have to be paid, which are part of the closing costs. The seller receives a check or bank transfer for the proceeds of the sale, minus the closing costs and mortgage payouts. Prepayments for real estate taxes and insurance may be taken from the funds allotted for closing costs, and fees charged by other parties are paid. Sometimes, closing in escrow, which is a neutral third party, may occur to prevent the two parties from getting ripped off.

At a closing, the basic idea is this: the buyer gives the seller their money and the seller gives the buyer the deed.