Buying a Rent Ready Property

When looking for properties to purchase as rentals, many investors prefer to focus on “rent-ready properties”.

The first and most important part of buying a rental property should be to learn about the current market conditions of the area. Always keep in mind that this is a rental, not a high end home. However, the way that your property stacks up to the direct competition in the area determines your rental amount and occupancy rate. You should make an effort to learn about what type of rental properties you’ll be competing for renters with, to make sure that you’re buying a property that’s in a comparable condition. This should of course be done before you even make an offer on the property to begin with.

 

Always keep in mind that this is will be your own property even though you are not going to live in it yourself. Make sure that the outer shell of the property is sound and in good condition and that all necessary improvements are completed. If the exterior of your building is compromised in any way, then the inside will be at risk as well.

Also decide what appliances you are going to provide by learning what other rental properties in the area are providing. As you evaluate a prospective property, look for possible liability risks more than minor blemishes. If you can’t physically visit the property yourself make sure that you get a copy of an inspection report.

 

Here are some issues to look for

  • Are all of the electrical plates present and in good repair?
  • Are there enough smoke detectors and are they placed properly?
  • Are there any issues with lead paint, mold or asbestos?
  • Check the handrails for a good tight fit.
  • Assure that the there are no plumbing leaks.
  • Pay particular attention to the big replacement cost items such as:
  • the Heating system – boiler, furnace, heat pump, etc.
  • air conditioning/cooling system
  • water heater
  • dish washer
  • garbage disposal

 

Make sure that the house you’re buying looks good so that you can retain the best tenants but you shouldn’t expect custom cabinets and granite countertops in a rental. High end fixtures are typically not required. Just make sure that it looks nice and clean. It’s ok to buy a lower grade home to use as a rental but make sure that it is actually livable.

 

Remember, if you agree to buy a property in “as-is condition” then you will need to make any necessary repairs that are needed. If you don’t want to do that, you should negotiate with the seller to fix things before closing.

 

Once you’ve owned the house for a while you may need to replace or repair some things. When you need to replace something in the house, try not to be too cheap. Some investors will take the attitude of “It’s a rental, we’ll just put in the cheapest products that they make and call it good. After all, renters typically are not as careful with houses as they would be if they owned the place.” Unfortunately for you, plastic faucets and cheap door locks break easily and can cost you more in the long run. If while your renter calls you to say that the faucet is leaking, or a locked door handle won’t turn, {because they’re cheap}, you have to fix it. Consider putting in just a bit higher quality than the absolute cheapest, especially if it doesn’t cost a whole lot more.